Choosing Print Type & Mount 101

There’s nothing like a monumental photograph hanging on a focal wall in your home or office.  Fine art photography is a very special investment and for most, deciding on print options and how to mount them can be daunting.  Let us help you decide! This article explains a few key words to understand how to buy fine art photography. 

Stephen Ciuccoli's "Genie Series No. 1" Museum Metallic Print mounted on Plexiglass installed in the gallery.

Stephen Ciuccoli's "Genie Series No. 1" Museum Metallic Print mounted on Plexiglass installed in the gallery.

Museum Metallic Prints have clean edges, making them vibrant and sharp in detail. Many people choose to mount these archival prints under flush-mounted plexiglass.  The effect of the print under plexiglass is a clean, contemporary presentation that appears to be floating on the wall.  Plexiglass can also be reflective and non-reflective.  If the buyer wants to place the piece in a room with a lot of lighting they may want to choose a non-reflective finish. 

Museum Metallic Prints mounted on Plexiglass come ready to hang with either a French clear system or with a hook on either side.

Flush Mounted Plexiglass Print

Flush Mounted Plexiglass Print

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Romeo & Juliet" Museum Metallic Print on Plexiglass

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Romeo & Juliet" Museum Metallic Print on Plexiglass

Cotton Rag Prints are more raw and natural looking. The paper is lightly textured, giving it a hand-made look.  Buyers are encouraged to frame a cotton rag print more traditionally by having it placed under museum glass and surrounded by a frame – white, black, or in some cases ornate – depending on the subject matter. Museum Glass provides the viewer amazing clarity and archival protection, blocking UV rays to prevent fading from the sun.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Freedom Vanishing" Cotton Rag Print framed with Museum Glass in a simple white frame.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Freedom Vanishing" Cotton Rag Print framed with Museum Glass in a simple white frame.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Vanishing Grace" Cotton Rag Print under Museum Glass and framed in brushed silver.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Vanishing Grace" Cotton Rag Print under Museum Glass and framed in brushed silver.

When framing a photograph, a great way to sharpen the edges of the photograph is to add a mat.  This allows for breathing room from the sides of the frame, as well as the glass.

Stephen Ciuccoli's "Elephants" Hahnemühle Photo Luster Print framed in black with a 1/2" inch silver scoop lip and 2" mat.

Stephen Ciuccoli's "Elephants" Hahnemühle Photo Luster Print framed in black with a 1/2" inch silver scoop lip and 2" mat.

Metal Sublimation is a printing process in which several layers of dye are infused onto a pre-treated aluminum surface.  The depth, clarity, and vividness of the work is emanated in a satin finish.  Buyers often choose this approach because of its not a reflective surface. Another way to enhance the metallic feel of a Metal Sublimation print is to frame it in a floater style frame.  

A side view of Kimmerlee Curyl's "Equus (Equal Us)" Metal Sublimation Print.

A side view of Kimmerlee Curyl's "Equus (Equal Us)" Metal Sublimation Print.

A side view of Kimmerlee Curyl's "Equus (Equal Us)" Metal Sublimation Print.

A side view of Kimmerlee Curyl's "Equus (Equal Us)" Metal Sublimation Print.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Great Divide Two" Metal Sublimation Print framed in a silver floater frame.

Kimmerlee Curyl's "Great Divide Two" Metal Sublimation Print framed in a silver floater frame.

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